WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TENCEL AND OUR CORE FABRICS?

 

Tencel is slightly heavier weight than our Modal, this is great for all season wear without being sheer. This has also made Tencel popular for uses in an array of luxurious women's clothing, as well as men's light dress shirts.

 

 

WHERE IT’S FROM


Tencel
Currently, we import the finished textiles from China. Both the raw yarns and knitting process is completed there. We hope in the future to be able to knit all of our fabrics in North America.



 

 

 

CREATING TENCEL

  

Tencel is made from the inner pulp of Eucalyptus trees. The tree will grow naturally on less than perfect land and reproduce itself without any human interaction, meaning there is no replanting required. Comparatively to Cotton, Tencel does not take away valuable land for growing food as it is a naturally occurring plant.

Unlike fully synthetic fibres, Tencel is biodegradable. This means, any clothing made with Tencel will return to the earth in your lifetime (but not, of course during your wearing of the product), whereas synthetic products like Polyester take a couple of hundred years to break down.

Through a “closed-loop system” the process of creating Tencel does not contribute waste to the outside world, in other words, promoting full reusable and recyclable matter. Furthermore, this pulp produced for Tencel fibres have earned Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certification for full sustainable practises end to end.

Quality wise, Tencel is slightly heavier weight than our Modal, this great for all season wear without being sheer. This has also made Tencel popular for uses in an array of luxurious women's clothing, as well as men's light dress shirts.

 

 

THE DYEING PROCESS

Tencel is either dyed with batches of warm or cold water. In our cold dyed garments, colours set more greatly into the fibres.

The difference between Cotton and Tencel can be shown in a single t-shirt!

Approximately 66 percent of the dye amount is needed for Tencel compared to that needed for cotton in order to achieve the same depth of saturation. As a whole, the dyeing process used for Tencel uses almost half the processing time (400 minutes vs. 690 minutes), less than half the energy (9.3MJ vs. 19.87MJ), a sixth of the land use (0.52 m2 vs 3.4m2), as well as 11 times less water need to process dyes (123 liters vs. 1430 liters).

 

 

HOW TO CARE FOR YOUR TENCEL CLOTHING

 

Washing your Tencel Encircled clothing in cold water will extend its lifespan. Tencel is prone to 3% shrinkage with first machine washing, the garment will be shrink resistant after this point when cared for properly.

To care for your Tencel clothing, hand wash, or put into machine on gentle cycle. Avoid bleach. Always hang to dry. Never scorch or iron on high heat, this will damage the texture.



 

 

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